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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common type of talk psychotherapy that’s used to treat a wide range of issues.  CBT takes a practical, task-based approach to solving problems, as the name suggests, CBT focuses on teaching a person to change their thoughts (cognition) and behaviors by becoming aware of inaccurate or negative thinking so you can view challenging situations more clearly and respond to them in a more effective way.

CBT has been successful in the treatment of many mental health issues and is helpful for anyone looking for a hands-on approach to treatment:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can help with any of the following:

  • Chronic Pain​​​​
  • Stressful life situations
  • Emotional trauma
  • Separation
  • Loss
  • Identify problems more clearly
  • Establish attainable goals
  • Better understand other peoples actions and motivations
  • Help identify ways to manage emotions.
  • Anger Management

Mental health disorders that may improve with CBT include:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Phobias
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, OCPD)
  • Addiction​​​​
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Gambling​​​​
  • Hypochondria
  • Sleep disorders
  • Eating disorders/Insomnia
  • Substance use disorders
  • Bipolar disorders
  • Schizophrenia
  • Sexual disorders

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy often includes:

  • Learning about your mental health condition
  • Identifying troubling situations or conditions in your life.
  • Becoming aware of your thoughts, emotions and beliefs about these problems.
  • Identifying negative or inaccurate thinking.
  • Reshape negative or inaccurate thinking.
  • Learning and practicing techniques such as relaxation, coping, resilience, stress management and assertiveness

In the process, you will learn to see things from a different perspective.

Although it is based on simple principles, it can have tremendous positive outcomes for individuals in learning practical self-help strategies. It is based on the theory that thinking negatively is a habit that can be broken.